Career Inventories & Opportunities
Identifying Interests
Discovering your career path and deciding on "what you want to be when you grow up" can be a very difficult decision, and for many, a daunting process.  I am including some tools and different links to help match the activities that you are interested in to potential careers. Results of the interest inventories are expressed using the six areas defined by John Holland (Hollands Code):  realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional which can be used to help you search for jobs that fit your personal Holland Code.

Interest Inventory Links:

http://www.princetonreview.com/careers.aspx (quick and easy)
http://www.roguecc.edu/counseling/HollandCodes/test.asp
http://www.careerkey.org/
http://www.careerassessment.com/
http://www.testingroom.com/
http://portal.mncis.intocareers.org/ (see Mrs. Turner or Ms. Sjoblad for the district username and password)

Identifying Values, Priorities and Motivators
To help you define the internal values, motivations, and priorities that guides you.  Finding a job that is in sync with your inner drive will likely make you feel more satisfied.

http://www.livecareer.com/quintessential
The CVS measures 10 work values:  Service Orientation, Team Orientation, Influence, Creativity, Prestige, Independence, Excitement, Personal Development, Financial Rewards, and Security.

http://www.dws.state.nm.us/careersolutions/CSS-workimport.html
This is a card sort activity.  You will need to have access to a printer.  Six work values are identified:  Achievement, Independence, Recognition, Relationships, Support, and Working Conditions.

Achievement and Aptitude Testing
For general information about some of the more common vocational aptitude tests, the following sites will be helpful:

http://www.baseops.net/militarybooks/asvab
http://www.act.org/
http://www.collegeboard.com/

Skills Inventories
To help you develop a list of transferable skills you have aquired.  This list becomes extremely useful when you are looking for a job that fits your skills and when you are writing a resume or preparing for an interview.

Links:

http://www.iseek.org/careers/skillsassessment
http://www.onetonline.org/skills/

Personality Assessments
Define your personality and then match it with jobs that will allow you to be yourself.  Also beneficial in helping you recognize what your weaknesses are so that you can learn to compensate for them.

http://www.personalitytype.com/quiz.html
The Myers-Briggs is one of the most commonly used personality assessments. Completing the entire MBTI is the best way to learn your four-letter personality type.  This site allows you to identify your type quickly, easlily, and for free.  It's important to note that using this quick online tool is not as reliable and does not come with an insightful interpretation by a professional who is familiar with the test.

http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes1.htm
This is a measure similar to the personality assessment with the Myers-Briggs.  Taking both assessments will help you confirm the accuracy of your personality type.

http://www.keirsey.com/
Although this site uses slightly different titles, it provides you with more information on temperament.  The four types are renamed- adventurer (artisan), defender (guardian), counselor (guardian), and scientist (rational).  This site is fun and insightful.

http://www.9types.com/rheti/index.php
This assessment groups people based on nine types and provides you with scores in all nine areas so that you can see how strongly you match each type.  The descriptions of each type are insightful and include both strengths and weaknesses.

Career Opportunities
http://www.monster.com/
http://www.careerbuilder.com/
http://www.careerplanner.com/ (A career planner)
http://www.iseek.org/ (MN gateway to career, education, employment, and business info.)
http://www.diplomaguide.com/ (Planning, career and degree research)
http://www.mncis.intocareers.org/ (See Mrs. Turner or Ms. Sjoblad for log in information)